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Mobile World Congress: Who Should You Visit?

by Neil Mawston | 2月 01, 2010

February is here. And that can only mean one thing: Mobile World Congress (MWC). The world's largest wireless trade show takes place in Barcelona, Spain, from Sunday 14th to Thursday 18th. In between eating, drinking and sitting in the sun, I might even do a little work. Which handset players will be important and who should I go visit?

Nokia is a good place to start. Nokia will stage an off-site event called Connecting People. Connecting People is its longstanding theme to connect people and places with devices and contextual services. Nokia will no doubt unveil a new handset model or two, but we don’t expect anything seismic because Nokia will not want its products to get overshadowed by the noise of MWC.

Samsung will be about Bada, the vendor’s new platform which sits on top of a proprietary or Linux kernel. We recommend demoing its new Bada phone, to see if it matches up with Android, Apple and Symbian devices for usability and richness.

LG, like Samsung, will have a big stand at the show. LG is keen to reposition as a credible smartphone player for 2010 and there will be heavy promotion of its Android and Microsoft portfolios. LG is expanding (belatedly) into content and there should be a display of its 3-Screen 3-Way Sync converged-application service for smartphones, netbooks and TVs.

Qualcomm will be found in several smartphones and smartbooks using its high-speed 1GHz Snapdragon processor. The chipmaker will show its roadmap for the next wave of 1.3GHz (8X50A) and 1.5GHz (8X72) Snapdragons, available for commercial launches of devices over the next 6 to 18 months.

The much-hyped Google Android HTC Nexus One will be on show. However, the handset will be of less interest than the business model. I’ll do some discreet research and see if we can get more color on Google’s underlying plans for its direct-to-consumer online distribution strategy.

We will see a few HSPA+ and LTE demos this year. The dongle players, such as Huawei and ZTE, should have such devices on their stands. This will be a double opportunity to see how next-generation technologies are progressing, while examining how the emerging Chinese brands are performing.

That is a partial snapshot of who I will be visiting. How about you? Let me know by clicking on the Comments link.

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