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Games console downloads emerge as key distribution channel

by David Mercer | Jan 15, 2009

Strategy Analytics has just published its analysis of a survey of console and PC gamers in the US. The ability to download content to games consoles is a relatively recent innovation but is now a feature of all the major systems – Wii, Xbox 360 and PS3. Our survey found that nearly a third of gamers in the US claim to buy and download games to a video games console. 21% are doing so on a monthly basis or more frequently. This compares to 35% of gamers who claim to buy games from a retail store at least on a monthly basis, or 28% who are ordering packaged games online for home delivery. Buying from retail stores is still the number one choice for less frequent games buyers. We also found, perhaps not surprisingly, that the games console brands (Wii, Xbox, PS3) are the first choice when it comes to buying games online. 27% of gamers willing to buy games online would choose the games console brand, compared to 19% who would go to the games publisher and less than 15% who would visit an online games specialist or general online retailer like Amazon. Microsoft’s recent revamp of its Xbox 360 interface was intended in part to encourage greater participation in online activities and paid-for downloads. It seems as though many console users are indeed ready and willing to make the most of online services and games downloads. While there is a clear opportunity for console platforms to develop new revenue streams, the outlook for bricks and mortar retailers appears to be less rosy. The study comes from Strategy Analytics' Digital Media Survey, conducted between April and June 2008 sampling 3,526 age 15+ broadband users across Germany, France, Italy, Spain, UK and the US. The US sample was 1000 broadband users. Twitter: www.twitter.com/dmercer15 Client Reading: Digital Media Survey: An analysis of US Gamers Add to Technorati Favorites
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